inno2-140210Swirl it
If a Wonder Washer and a Hippo Water Roller hooked up and had a baby, it would turn out like the Swirl (judging by the psychedelic design they must also have dropped acid during conception). Swirl is a plastic sphere with a lid and a detachable handle that is used to push the ball around. The idea is to fill it with your laundry, roll it to the closest water source, add water, and then roll it, bounce it or kick it back home. If all goes according to plan, by the time you get back, your washing should be done. The Swirl is aimed particularly at people in rural areas where lugging laundry to the river or lake often over long distances and difficult terrain and then spending hours washing it all, is a time-consuming and exhausting task. As far as I can tell, the Swirl is still a concept but already it has fans begging for it to go into production (studioblog.designaffairs.com).





inno1-140210Safety glasses
In the English tradition of pub brawling, the pint glass is the weapon of choice.  The annual cost to the state of injuries caused by pint glasses? A whopping £2.7 million! Britain's Home Secretary, Alan Johnson has decided to tackle the problem not by introducing harsher laws to control bar fights, but by making pint glasses that are less likely to splinter when broken over someone's head. The British Design Council has appointed entrepreneurial British firm DesignBridge to reinvent it. So far, DesignBridge has come up with two prototypes – the Twin Wall and the Glass Plus. Twin Wall is constructed from two ultra-thin glasses bonded together with resin and Glass Plus has a thin layer of clear bio-resin which is applied to the inside of the glass during production.

Nano Scale
Physicists at Caltech have developed a microscopic device that can measure the mass of a single molecule in real time. The tiny scale will help determine the chemical identities of unknown substances and could eventually allow scientists to analyse thousands of different proteins in a matter of milliseconds using much smaller samples than before.